Sunday, September 09, 2007

North Sea Divers


High compensation for pioneer divers
Three pioneer divers who risked their lives in the early years of oil exploration in the North Sea have finally won their fight for economic compensation.



11.08.2007 08:44


The Oslo Magistrates Court has ruled that the State shall pay the three altogether NOK 30 million in compensation for after-effects from the diving and for loss of income.

This is the first ime that North Sea divers have won a case for compensation against the State, for injuries they claim were sustained during the pioneer years of oil exploration in the North Sea.

Many divers suffered serious injuries because they were operating at hazardous depths at the start of the Norwegian oil age in the 1960s and 70s.

At least 60 divers lost their lives in the North Sea up to the year 2000. At least 19 of these were Norwegians.

Several other cases are waiting to be processed by the courts. @ The Norway Post


And some background on the diving itself:

*A brief insight into saturation diving.*

Not everyone who reads this page knows what saturation diving is. This is a brief explanation written by Derek Moore

Being a Diver is a career for the few exceptional individuals that choose a life of isolation and thrive on a feeling of accomplishment.

The waters of the North Sea are a hostile and unforgiving environment. It is in this environment that a group of men constantly work under arduous conditions to accomplish tasks they are asked to perform that would leave many to seek sanctuary elsewhere. These men are Saturation Divers.

Saturation diving is a technique that allows men to work underwater for extended periods without having to undergo repeated decompression and offers a greater potential for the company, in terms of flexibility of productive working time, over other methods of diving. They say a diver is a jack of all trades, when in reality they are masters in their chosen field. But someone asked; what is the life of a Sat diver like?

Divers, in order to work at a chosen depth with out the need to continually decompress, are required to live at the same pressure of the sea bed they are working at. They live in a chamber (A metal tube) which is 2.1 metres in diameter and varying in length of 5 to 6 metres. Attached to this is a smaller chamber 2 to 2.5 metres in length (called a transfer lock) which gives access to the diving bell, it also serves as a toilet and shower area. For the whole period of the saturation divers will be confined (sleeping and eating) to this area with up to a further 5 colleagues. To get some idea of the space, measure the area in your office; now imagine 3 bunk beds and a table and 2 bench seats. Now imagine you can’t escape for up to 28 days. Living with up to 5 other guys in a confined space, who all have their own personalities and quirky habits, requires a high degree of tolerance and humour. If you need your space or easily stressed don’t consider sat diving an option.

Going into sat, the teams are chosen based on their experience and qualifications. The doors are closed and the initial inrush of Helium gas starts the pressurisation which is instantly recognised up the change of vocal expression increasing a few octaves. As the pressurisation continues the temperature rises as the surrounding atmosphere is compressed. This is the point of no return, no escape, everything you now need (food, water, clothing, laundry and equipment) is the responsibility of the outside technicians. Your only access to the world outside is the lock through which all you require is sent.

You communicate with outside colleagues not on a face to face level but via a communications system and communication to loved ones at home is by the typed word only. Like a space man you are isolated.

Life in sat becomes very routine; you are woken up to go diving, given food, dive plans and briefing of the job in hand. Taking turns one diver enters the bell via the transfer lock to conduct safety checks, after which the remaining divers enter the bell to begin their journey to the work site up to 600 feet below. When the pressures in the bell and the water are equal the divers venture into the frigid water of aqua space to perform their allotted tasks, either construction, inspection, survey or salvage. I call it aqua space having read the interview with Mike Gernhardt, a NASA Astronaut who started his career working as a diver for Ocean Systems before graduating with an honours degree in bubble dynamics. He said the techniques he learned in diving, he adapted for use in space, but hyper space walking was the ultimate dive.

The difference in aqua space is the visibility is not a million miles but can be limited to a few inches, making the task in hand increasingly difficult as you are effectively working blind doing the job by feel. It can be challenging and not for the claustrophobic. After 6 hours working the divers return to the bell before returning to the chamber they departed earlier back on the vessel.

Here they send out their diving wear, shower and have a meal before retiring to bed. Each day follows the same routine until it is time to decompress where the divers will be confined to the chamber until the pressure is reduced to atmospheric level and the door opens. That is until the next time the diver goes into saturation. If you consider sat diving easy, the door of opportunity is open, but can you handle it shut.

I remember this quote by a diver whose name fails me which sums up offshore divers. “The Ocean weeds out, from all the races of mankind that come upon it to make a living, a certain type of person. This type of person stays with the ocean, and the rest are cast back ashore to deal with the land people.”

Derek Moore
@ Pioneer Divers

Risking ones life for his/her country is the real measure of a hero.

These men are that and more and deserve recognition for their treacherous and in many cases deadly work.

Justice has prevailed for our friend Erling and his fellow divers.

Congratulations Erling!

And a moment of reflection for the ones that did not survive.

.

17 comments:

DEN said...

Another sunny Sunday here in atheist Northern CA, where all us heathens spend our time fornicating and stuff.

I welcome our new visitor, "the activist" from West Covina.

Pull up a keyboard and let us know what you really think, don't get too out of line though of I'll have Carol slap you down.

Thats a joke son.

I however cannot afford to dabble on the keyboard during 'riding hours' so play nice all!

David B. Benson said...

Always good to see another's views, even if one doesn't agree with them...

David B. Benson said...

Paul Rogat Leob, on The Smirking Chimp discuses Wild Weather.

This is a useful opinion piefce regarding the 2007 Energy Bill, and how you can help to see to it that a good version is obtained.

Gerald said...

Wonderful!

Yes, life is wonderful in the United States of Evil. Another Pro Football season is upon us. As we watch the televised games with our WIDE BOTTOMS on our favorite chair and a twelve pack near us.

This is no time to worry about the pain and suffering that Nazi America inflicts upon the human population of the world. As long as our WIDE BOTTOMS are comfortable, there is no need to worry about our brothers and sisters in God.

Yes, another season of football and a twelve pack are close to our heart and lips.

Gerald said...

Beg for an Increase of Love

Gerald said...

Pray for All Lives Lost in Iraq

Gerald said...

Doing Good Is Good for You

Studies show that volunteers reap important rewards by helping others. For example, “it’s one of the best ways people over 60 can contribute to their own well-being,” says Linda Fried, director of the Center on Aging and Health at Johns Hopkins University, who has studied the benefits of volunteering.

Child psychologists also report that volunteer work helps young people increase self-esteem and learn valuable socialization skills.

“There’s nothing like giving to someone else and realizing you are strengthening the fundamental fabric of society,” says Diana Aviv, president of the Independent Sector. “Volunteering increases a person’s sense of responsibility…”

A woman who found she was slipping into sedentary retirement cherishes her life’s direction after she became a literacy volunteer. “The children and the friends I’ve made through this organization are like angels to me. I just want to keep on giving.”

Consider becoming a volunteer today.

Faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead. (James 2:17)

Enlighten my search for volunteer opportunities, Father of all. Help me serve You by serving others.

Gerald said...

Out of a Shared Experience, Compassion

Homelessness is part of both Dr. Anna Lou Dehavenon’s past and her present.

A research scientist who has dedicated the last 25 years to homelessness and hunger in her native New York City, Dr. Dehavenon spends most of each day dealing with homeless families.
Years ago as a 26-year-old widow with two small children, she herself had been homeless and without an extended family. She leaned on friends for help. “I had been homeless,” she realized. “It never occurred to me at the time, only when looking back.”

Homelessness and hardships can strike anyone, anytime. Show compassion to the needy. One day, you might be walking in their shoes.

In everything do to others as you would have them do to you; for this is the Law and the Prophets. (Matthew 7:12)

Merciful Savior, imbue us with Your own righteous indignation at the poverty in the midst of our abundance.

Gerald said...

A Symbiotic Relationship Continues

Gerald said...

Our Silence, Our Guilt

Gerald said...

Bush has been in Australia making a fool out of himself and the rest of the country. The best thing that this President could do at this particular point in his life is to just shut-up. Just about everything he says and does, proves to the world that we have an idiot in the White House. The fact that he is responsible for almost a million people losing their lives is probably lost on him. He still envisions himself as a staunch defender of America and I honestly believe that he feels no guilt or remorse for the dead and dying. This makes him either a sociopath, or pretty much of a fool. I think it’s a combination of both.

Every American that died in Iraq was someone’s son, brother, father, daughter, mom, or friend. Bush, in my opinion, doesn’t see it that way. I believe that he sees them as numbers, statistics. I believe Bush believes that part of the job he has as President, is to ask others to make the “supreme sacrifice”. He is unfortunately, right. The President of the United States has the authority to send American soldiers into harm’s way. The part of the equation that he doesn’t have a good grasp of, is the part that mentions the concept of “a clear and present danger” to the nation and its people. Just as many despots that came before Bush, he has confused American interests with his own flawed perception of the issues America faces. This will ultimately insure his place in history not as a defender of freedom and justice, but as another despotic warmonger that indiscriminately causes the death of innocent people.

Gerald said...

Bush has been in Australia making a fool out of himself and the rest of the country. The best thing that this President could do at this particular point in his life is to just shut-up. Just about everything he says and does, proves to the world that we have an idiot in the White House. The fact that he is responsible for almost a million people losing their lives is probably lost on him. He still envisions himself as a staunch defender of America and I honestly believe that he feels no guilt or remorse for the dead and dying. This makes him either a sociopath, or pretty much of a fool. I think it’s a combination of both.

Every American that died in Iraq was someone’s son, brother, father, daughter, mom, or friend. Bush, in my opinion, doesn’t see it that way. I believe that he sees them as numbers, statistics. I believe Bush believes that part of the job he has as President, is to ask others to make the “supreme sacrifice”. He is unfortunately, right. The President of the United States has the authority to send American soldiers into harm’s way. The part of the equation that he doesn’t have a good grasp of, is the part that mentions the concept of “a clear and present danger” to the nation and its people. Just as many despots that came before Bush, he has confused American interests with his own flawed perception of the issues America faces. This will ultimately insure his place in history not as a defender of freedom and justice, but as another despotic warmonger that indiscriminately causes the death of innocent people.

David B. Benson said...

Gerald --- The best thing Bush could do at this point is resign, taking Cheney with him.

I'm sure Nancy Pelosi would make an adequate interim president...

DEN said...

These people alone pose more of a danger to our country than OBL, they have stripped and pillaged our lives and ended many others.

They are NOT nice people.

They need to be shown the door.

Restore Democracy and Freedom to the United States.

Boot the fashits.

David B. Benson said...

The size of the carbon problem: since 1850, the people of the world have added about 482 billion tonnes of carbon into the carbon cycle, where this unnatural surplus has caused the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to go from about 188 ppm to about 383 ppm.

In addition the people of the world are adding another 8 billion tonnes per year, currently, although the rate keeps going up.

So we need to counter-balance that 8 billion tonnes per year and start taking out some of that 482 billion tonnes. I suggest 70% of it is a good interim goal. This will bring the concentration back down to 315 ppm, where it was in 1950. If in addition to counter-balancing the current increase, another 7 billion tonnes of carbon can be sequestered, it would take about 48 years to remove the required 337 billion tonnes.

I suggest the safest way to do this is use hydrothermal carbonization to produce biocoal. Put the biocoal (that which isn't used to replace fossil coal) back into the ground at abandoned mines and carbon landfills.

Assuming biofuels can completely replace fossil fuels, this means sequestering about 10 billion tonnes of carbon per year. If the costs of doing so are the same as the cost of digging fossil coal out of the ground, then around $36 per tonne is required.

And that a $360 billion dollars per year price tag for 48 years. But it might be somewhat cheaper. Maybe only $200 billion per year...

DEN said...

Doc, very cool concept!

Chemical answer to a chemical problem.

I found this elaboration on your post.

Worldwide co-operation needed to make it work, tough task there alone.

DEN said...

sleep:thirty on my watch