Thursday, April 03, 2008

@The Nation

Time to Break the Silence

Katrina vanden Heuvel


Since 1865, when it was founded by Northern abolitionists, The Nation has always believed in the liberating power of truth, of conviction, of conscience, and of fighting for causes lost and found. And like our founders, the magazine has an abiding belief that there is no force so potent in politics as a moral issue.

One of the great moral figures of our country's history, Martin Luther King Jr. was a correspondent for The Nation--traveling the South in the early 1960s and filing annual dispatches for the magazine on the state of civil rights. In 1967, Dr. King traveled to Los Angeles under the auspices of The Nation and The Nation Institute to give the speech that would align the armies of the Civil Rights Movement with the rapidly expanding national protest against the Vietnam War. It was at this gathering, before an overflow crowd at the Beverly Hills Hilton on February 25, that Dr. King first came out, courageously, eloquently and unequivocally , against the war. Two months later, on April 4th, King delivered his famous antiwar sermon at Riverside Church in New York City.

Today we are again mired in an intractable and monstrous war overseas. It is a moment to listen to Dr. King's words about the broader casualties of another war--casualties that go beyond the carnage of battle to the devastating costs of war at home--the damage to social justice and racial equality, and the unbearable cost to free speech and dissent.

"I do not wish to minimize the complexity of the problems that need to be faced in achieving disarmament and peace. But I think it is a fact that we shall not have the will, the courage, and the insight to deal with such matters unless in this field we are prepared to undergo a spiritual and mental reevaluation, a change of focus which will enable us to see that the things which seem most real and powerful are, indeed, now unreal and have come under the sentence of death. We need to make a supreme effort to generate the readiness, indeed, the eagerness, to enter into the new world which is now possible. We will not build a peaceful world by following a negative path. It is not enough to say 'We must not wage war.' It is necessary to love peace and sacrifice for it. We must concentrate not merely on the negative expulsion of war but on the positive affirmation of peace....In short, we must shift the arms race into a peace race" ,Dr. Martin Luther King

@ The Nation

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15 comments:

DEN said...

Zero comments?

Soon to be standing room only on the few airlines left?

NEW YORK (Reuters) - ATA Airlines Inc said on Thursday it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and discontinued all operations after the cancellation of a key military charter agreement.

The Indianapolis-based low cost airline and its rivals have also been hurt by big increases in jet fuel prices. ATA is the second airline to file for bankruptcy in the past few weeks.

The fuel price spike, coupled with a steadily weakening U.S. economy, has stalled the airline industry's modest recovery from the 2001-2006 downturn.

On Sunday, Hawaii-based Aloha Airlines said it would shut down its passenger operations less than two weeks after it filed for bankruptcy protection.

Big airlines are beginning to shrink to cope with much tougher operating conditions. On March 18, Delta Air Lines Inc unveiled plans to cut 2,000 jobs and scale back flights.

Carriers have also moved to pass on fuel costs to travelers through higher fares and surcharges. Some airlines have opened new revenue streams by charging for products and services that previously had been included in the price of a ticket.

@ Reuters
....................................

Can't afford to fly can't afford to drive, guess we better buy horses and buggies.

David B. Benson said...

In the total history of airlines, the owners have, on average, always lost money.

Like AMTRAK.

Alan said...

No kidding Dr B? I can understand AMTRAK, because it's subsidized, but how can the airlines still be in business if they've always lost money?

micki said...

There's a saying in the airline industry: You can make a small fortune in aviation; just start with a big one.

The airline industry is one of the most mismanaged and poorly planned industries in history, IMO.

The loss sheets are dotted with names that claimed globe-trotting luxury before they faced their demise: Pan Am, Braniff, Eastern, TWA. In the U.S., the Air Transport Assn records at least 100 airline bankruptcies since deregulation in 1978.

Many flagship carriers in other countries are artificially preserved with government support. They collapse when the plug is pulled or when the airlines try to expand beyond their borders. Swissair and Sabena (Belgium) are casualties. And the merger of KLM and Air France shows that even those airlines thought of as rock-solid are facing hard financial realities.

According to Warren Buffet, airlines haven't netted a dime since 1903. Warren is undoubtedly right.

In Alaska, I worked for a "family-owned" airline -- Reeve Aleutian Airlines -- mostly as a trainer, but we wore various hats. That airline served the Aleutian Chain (and earlier other points in Alaska) for about 50 years, but ceased operations in 2000.

It was exciting to fly to The Pribilofs, Dutch Harbor, Cold Bay, Adak, Attu, Shemya, etc. -- even Amchitka once. Reeve often flew by the seat of their pants -- but did have the best pilots in the business!

Alan said...

The Top 10 Myths Keeping Hillary in the Race

I rate this one the most stupid and/or dishonest...

Myth: Okay, the popular vote is tied.


There are people who claim that because of the 3% separation, that Obama's lead in the popular vote is a "statistical tie." This is a myth because, when you can actually count things, there's no need of statistics and no such thing as a margin of error. The popular vote is not an estimate based on a sampling, like a poll. Like the general election, there are winners and losers and, so far, Obama is the winner.

Saladin said...

Greetings DEN, I'm sure the following news flash will further encourage people to fly!

U.S. AIRLINE MECHANICS OUTSOURCED - FAA OK'D IT

http://money. cnn. com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/200804021735DOWJONESDJONLINE000960_FORTUNE5. htm

Outsourcing Becomes Focal Point In Aircraft-Safety Debate
Dow Jones
April 02, 2008: 05:35 PM EST

The growing percentage of maintenance work that has been outsourced by U.S. airlines has become a focal point in the debate over whether proper procedures are in place to ensure aircraft safety.



In what has become a hot-button issue in recent weeks, the Federal Aviation Administration is taking a closer look at how it regulates aircraft maintenance at U.S. airlines. Congress on Thursday will hold hearings to review issues around the safety and security of outsourcing.



Many U.S. airlines have increased outsourcing over the past several years to cut maintenance costs. But concerns are mounting that monitoring of that work isn't sufficient, particularly when work is done outside the U.S.



FAA regulations haven't kept pace with the work that is being sent overseas, critics say. Currently there are about 700 FAA-certified foreign repair facilities in far-flung locations like South Korea and El Salvador. The FAA monitors all maintenance programs, but relies on airlines to conduct detailed audits of the facilities.



In an example of the growing importance of the issue, the Business Travel Coalition found that among more than 1,000 travel professionals surveyed this week, more than half said they would find it useful to have information on where airlines' maintenance is performed. Nearly 70% said they would book tickets on an airline that maintained its aircraft at its own facilities, with FAA- certified mechanics and FAA oversight, over another airline that outsourced its aircraft maintenance.



According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, between 1996 and 2006, airlines increased the percentage of outsourced maintenance to 64% from 37%. In 2006, $3.7 billion went to third-party maintenance providers, of a total $5.7 billion spent on maintenance.



Airlines currently aren't required to give regulators very specific information about the vendors who do their maintenance work. Mechanics at foreign facilities are trained by the airlines, but don't have to be certified by the FAA.



Airlines vary in how much outsourcing they do. Low-cost Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV), which was recently fined $10.2 million by the FAA for safety lapses, has always hired others to perform maintenance on its planes. United Airlines, a unit of UAL Corp. (UAUA), recently has increased its outsourcing. American Airlines, part of AMR Corp. (AMR), and Delta Air Lines Inc. (DAL) do their maintenance in-house, and bring in work from other airlines.



In early March, following a whistle-blowing incident by one of its workers, the FAA asked airlines to conduct voluntary inspections. That has resulted in several airlines' suddenly grounding parts of their fleet to check for specific problems.



The FAA said Wednesday that, during spot checks, it found that airlines were 99% in compliance on aircraft maintenance.



But that won't ease the concerns of officials like James Oberstar, D-Minn., head of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee that will hear testimony on Thursday. Oberstar has criticized what he called the FAA's "lax attitude" toward the airlines it oversees, and has said he may support legislation to stiffen the FAA's safety-inspection program.



According to Bob Mann, a consultant and former Boeing 747 pilot, it makes sense to update FAA oversight policies, given the rapid growth of new maintenance facilities. "Inspectors can't hover over every mechanic," he said. But the FAA can put systems in place that assure regular reviews of maintenance activities.



Unable to afford new planes, many U.S. airlines are flying older aircraft. That in itself isn't a safety concern, Mann said. "Airplanes age gracefully," he said. "Some cracks may appear, but we know how to fix them.

"

"The issue is, as air traffic doubles in the coming years, we don't want to double the number of airline accidents.

"

-By Ann Keeton, Dow Jones Newswires; 312-750-4120; ann.keeton@dowjones.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Twilight zone for sure!

David B. Benson said...

Micki --- Since Hajji didn't receive the e-mail I sent to him, and there is a new system to monitor both incoming and outgoing e-mail traffic for spam, I have sent to your e-mail address

Test Message #1

to which I request that you respond (assuming the spam filter doesn't just throw it in the bit bucket, that is).

If that workd ok, I'll send you another, with the same attachment I sent to Hajji. Again kindly respond if the message arrives.

Thanks.

David B. Benson said...

"Beware the heavy hands of the (formerly friendly) Nathan Cummings Foundation. They have many arms (like AlterNet) which internally promote their own people, without acknowledging their funding and connections."

Alex
Radio Ecoshock

carey said...

I had read Katrina's speech. Good for posting it.

Yes, what about travel for everyone this summer? Hijole! (Son of a .....) It is not looking good.

Jesus, what about John Yoo? My goodness almighty. Here's kind of where my head went contemplating just how deep this goes. The legal aspects are huge.

Guantanamo Endgame

It has become painfully clear that the Administration's concern is to have not a credible, transparent trial of 9/11 conspirators but election-year convictions at any cost; the only "security" that officials hope to protect is their own freedom from embarrassment and accountability. In early April the Justice Department at last revealed former Office of Legal Counsel lawyer John Yoo's sweeping, previously classified 2003 memorandum declaring that the President's wartime power nullifies all laws and treaties against torture. That memo--which empowered the military to physically and psychologically torture detainees and suggested that interrogators would be immune from criminal prosecution--was rescinded for cosmetic purposes after nine months, but its underlying reasoning motivates the Bush Administration to this day. The Defense Department continues, in the face of a new lawsuit by the ACLU, to block release of unredacted recent testimony in which fourteen prisoners transferred to Guantánamo from "black sites" describe brutal treatment and torture.

This is the Guantánamo endgame: with the clock running down, George W. Bush and his team are trying to keep one step ahead of history and of criminal charges, as the full extent of their assault on the Constitution becomes known.

carey said...

I state again, the fact that young and old alike, white people included, have asked a black man to lead them to change is made possible by the Bush/Cheney overthrow of the constitution.

The country has fallen to it's knees thanks to Bush/Cheney and their radical revolution. They brought it on themselves.

Golden irony.

Hajji said...

Den,

Interesting you should post this...

I often hang up phrases and tidbits around my computer, just because we don't usually have time to chat around the ER and I like to keep my folks thinkin' even when their mouths aren't going.

Today it was the ENTIRE text of the I May not GET there with you" (or "sneeze") MLK speech given on this day in 1968.

I thought it good coincidence when I checked in at "The Nation" that this article was at the top.

It is with renewed hope that I see this, before going to bed tonight. Having ANY hope after almost 16hrs in the ER today, sure makes a bad day better.

I needed this because I won't even be able to get my Hops level back up to "theraputic" until tommorrow night.

Thank you!

-T

DEN said...

You know Hajji, many people are great men of wisdom, MLK was one of them.

Ideals have no borders or restrictions, they are inside the human mind, the right way, the true path.

Alan said...

Hajji,
You should check out this site. Note which speech is ranked the best. Be careful, you can spend hours listening to these.

American Rhetoric:The Top 100 Speeches

Alan said...

I state again, the fact that young and old alike, white people included, have asked a black man to lead them to change is made possible by the Bush/Cheney overthrow of the constitution.

Carey, I'm listening to MLK's "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech (number 15). In it was a line that fits with your statement above. It was something about you can't see the stars till it's dark enough.

Alan said...

Yeah, ok. I didn't know for sure till I listened, but the "Mountaintop" speech is the same one Hajji was referring to. "I may not get there with you" is at the very end and it's pretty long. "I Have A Dream" is ranked the best, and I agree, but I think "I've Been to the Mountaintop" should be up there closer than 15.