Sunday, May 25, 2008

Raceday!

Danica-mania envelops Indianapolis

Race driver Danica Patrick rests her head on her helmet during a break in practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Thursday, May 15, 2008. (AP Photo/Tom Strattman)

Race driver Danica Patrick rests her head on her helmet during a break in practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Thursday, May 15, 2008. (AP Photo/Tom Strattman)

INDIANAPOLIS — Danica Patrick was making her first qualification attempt in May, and the grounds of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway resembled one massive game of freeze-tag.

TOM STRATTMAN / Associated Press Still riding the momentum of her historic first win in Japan, Danica Patrick will be looking to cement her status as one of the IndyCar Series' top drivers when she starts in the second row of the 92nd Indy 500 today.

TOM STRATTMAN / Associated Press Still riding the momentum of her historic first win in Japan, Danica Patrick will be looking to cement her status as one of the IndyCar Series' top drivers when she starts in the second row of the 92nd Indy 500 today.

Along pit row, competing teams stopped what they were doing and turned eyes to the timing stands.

Race driver Danica Patrick, center, is surrounded by the media during an interview session for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Thursday, May 22, 2008. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Race driver Danica Patrick, center, is surrounded by the media during an interview session for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Thursday, May 22, 2008. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

In the stands along the straightaway, fans stood and peered toward the fourth turn, waiting for Patrick's black-and-blue racer.

In the infield, out of sight but not sound, the young and old alike stared at huge video screens and waited for track announcer Bob Jenkins to offer lap-by-lap speeds.

And in the executive suites, top officials of what now is simply called the IndyCar Series were not-so-subtly rooting on the young woman who, it seems, could finish what the unification of the IRL and Champ Car Series started — bring plenty of positive attention back to North American open-wheel racing.

DANICA PATRICK

  • Birthdate: March 25, 1982
  • Age: 26
  • Hometown: Roscoe, Ill.
  • Residence: Phoenix, Ariz.
  • Height/weight: 5-1, 105
  • Husband: Paul Hospenthal
  • Website: danicaracing.com
  • IndyCar starts: 51
  • IndyCar wins: 1, at Japan on April 19

Patrick's speed three Saturdays ago was fast enough — at 225.197 mph for the four, 21/2-mile laps — to put her, briefly, on the pole for the 92nd Indianapolis 500.

While it did not hold up, she'll start today's Indy 500 in the middle of the second row, between Helio Castroneves and Tony Kanaan and behind Scott Dixon, Dan Wheldon and Ryan Briscoe.

At the least, IndyCar racing has a buzz. And if Patrick should win the 500, the series will move back to the top of the sports pages — above even the showcase NASCAR event in Charlotte that will unfold later in the day.

More here

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Ladies first? Tune in and see. ESPN or ABC starting about 15 minutes ago was pre-race stuff, so you still have time. (9:17 AM)

9 comments:

David B. Benson said...

Carol --- Much Ado about Nothing

Alan said...

Well, I guess you know Danica got knocked out of the race by an idiot coming out of his pit.

Alan said...

Not unlike what happened to Danica, the other female in the race Sarah Fisher, was taken out with no fault of her own. Both women were upset, to say the least. One cried (Sarah), the other headed for the idiot's pit with kickass on her mind, but was sidetracked by the Director of Security for the track.

The Coca-Cola 600 is 'bout to start. NASCAR is still more popular than open-wheel racing.

Carey said...

Interesting Alan.



On the subject of the campaign race:


Hmmmm. You think much ado about nothing?

I think not. Hillary's true colors, that have been there for all to see repeatedly, are once again showing themselves in their truer neon, brash light.

No, not this time around. Freudian slips speak volumes. This wasn't Freudian. Please don't make up thoughts and excuses for her. They were loud and clear for all to see.

Don't try to pussyfoot around this one Ms. Clinton.

Please. You must leave, and leave yesterday.

Carey said...

Hillary said what she meant.

She's been hinting at this all along. It has been the unspoken ickyness that haunts her campaign. In every facet. This is an act of despertion.

You do not bring up RFK in the same paragraph with 'anything could happen' type of reasoning as an answer to the question asked.

Excuse me, there is a black candidate running. Oh, might I remind you, you are a woman and also a likely victim of such a horrendous hate act?

She said what she meant. Anything, like an assasination attempt, could happen. How much more clearly does she have to spell it out?

You don't see this? How dare she.

How effin dare she to put this in the ether.

ยบ¿carol said...

Thanks for answering my question, Dr. B. You're the only one that did and it's as I figured, much ado about nothing.

I watched the yakkers on the Sunday morning news shows. To me it was still a bunch of bull shit. And I lost any respect I ever had for Bob Schieffer, or whatever his name is. The guy he was talking to explained the Hillary thing just as I see it and Schieffer wouldn't let it go. Made me sick. At long last Schieffer said they should move on. Yeah! Get off that bull shit subject. Geez.

David B. Benson said...

Opinions differ.

It would be quite dull if they did not.

Carey said...

Boy, do they differ.

David B. Benson said...

Here is a link for Saladin:

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